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Copyright, what is it?

Updated: Mar 5, 2022

If you buy one of my works, congratulations, you are supporting a woman in a small business in Australia.

I might have painted it 20 times over when I painted an artwork before getting the look I wanted. Sometimes I'm fortunate, and the planets aline, and it takes one go.

Anyone who buys an original art piece will have invested their money in the most valued item.

Sometimes I have a little cry when I sell these, but I have to, or I can't continue to live and progress as an artist.

The artist still owns the copyright. If the artist then decides to do a limited or open amount of prints, it increases the value of the original art you have bought. There are no, and I mean NO, changes to this rule.

Number one of the limited or open prints will be the next valued. These can increase in value, especially if many images have been bought. Just think about all the old masters and how valuable the originals are. The sources hold and increase in value.

Number one of the limited or open prints will be the next valued. These can increase in value, especially if they have been bought. Just think about all the old masters and how valuable the originals are. The sources hold and increase in value all the time. Value all the time. 't made. The artist can only arrange photos because we must sign them individually and note the edition number. I also provide a certificate of authenticity and keep a logbook of who bought the print.

There are new genres of collectors all the time; the next collector in Vogue is a collector of illustrations. These are increasing in value all the time. There's been an uprising of collecting magazines from the fifties and sixty for their illustration content.

Illustrations are valued items; they often sell a dress that viewers can interpret themselves in. Usually, the models are not smiling, as, as soon as you bring a smile into an illustration, it has human content about it. This means the dress now belongs to someone, and it's not yours.

If the model is abstract or non-expressive-expressive, it's easier to replace you with them, often leading to more sales and exciting artwork.

To illustrate a human element, personality or character is a caricature.

Back to copyright.

It's not a bad thing. It protects the artist as the 1st author of the work. Which in turn gives me the artist a name that warrants collecting. Which is a fantastic thing for you if you hold the original or early runs of the print. But this is not going to happen if images aren't made. The artist can only arrange photos because we must sign them individually and note the edition number. I also provide a certificate of authenticity and keep a logbook of who bought the print.

I don't always do prints for many different reasons, but those reasons are mine, not yours.

I also like to have a copy of the work myself, especial if I put much love into the work.

So please don't deprive me, or you

Prints are here for a reason, and it's all GOOD










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